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Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Happy November 4th Birthdays!


We haven't done birthdays in a while but we've got some great ones for today, a trio of very different but iconic television faces.


Veteran character actor Ian Wolfe was born on this date in 1886!  Wolfe, a WW I veteran, was a supporting player on stage and in movies since 1934 and became a very familiar face on TV since the start of the medium in the very early 1950s.  His list of credits runs from 1934's Mutiny on the Bounty to 1990's Dick Tracy and everything in between, for a total of around 300 separate appearances.  Astounding!  Ian Wolfe passed away in 1992 at the age of 95, leaving us an impressive legacy of talent and memorable performances.  Fans of the original Star Trek will remember him in two great guest star roles, in the episodes "Bread and Circuses" and "All Our Yesterdays".







American journalism icon Walter Cronkite was born on this date in 1916.  Synonymous with CBS and a big part of what made it deserve the nickname "The Tiffany Network", Cronkite was known as "The Most Trusted Man in America" and rightly so -- his integrity as a newsman over his long career was unimpeachable.  There is a Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at ASU which aims to teach the next generation of newspeople some of what made Cronkite a legend.  He passed away in 2009 after decades of memorable intelligent coverage.  His legacy won't ever be equalled..."and that's the way it is."







Brilliant actor Art Carney was born on this date in 1918.  The multi-talented Carney -- dramatic actor, singer, comic -- got his start in radio, rapidly becoming a frequent guest performer thanks to his musical and mimicry talents.  He soon transitioned to TV where his partnership with Jackie Gleason led to his long stint as the hilarious Ed Norton in The Honeymooners and on Gleason's variety show.   He won an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the 1974 movie Harry and Tonto and worked in all genres, but no doubt his greatest creation was sewer worker Norton, a slyly suave, adorably eccentric and unerringly loyal pal to Ralph Kramden.






Happy Birthday, Gentlemen!

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