Monday, August 18, 2008

Emmy Awards Countdown Begins!


ABC has a spiffed-up webpage for the upcoming Emmy Awards airing Sunday, September 21, 2008, including voting for Television's Most Memorable Moments. That's right up our alley around here, and we highly recommend a visit to make your choices known! Many Nose favorites are in the running, including a scene from ST:TOS episode City on the Edge of Forever, I Love Lucy's Job Switching, and many others. Get on over and vote!

Here's ABC's neat Emmy widget, too!

6 comments:

Dean Treadway said...

I'll be watching. I mean, how can John Adams and Mad Men lose? No way!!

Jane said...

It's weird, I am far more excited about this year's Emmy Awards than I was for the Academy Awards! It's all about the content...I really had no favorites for movies this year but there is a ton of great TV!

Lisa said...

I agree, Jane! By far more interesting and certainly a plethora of great choices! Can't wait!

Dean Treadway said...

Okay. I don't think I need to ask Lisa and Jane in particular what they picked as their favorite comedy and drama moments out of the forty clips (twenty each genre) that were provided us. But I'm-a askin' anyway.

For my part, it was a tough choice.

IN COMEDY:
This was the most difficult category of course. Comedy on TV has somehow always worked better than drama. This is a subjective view of things, but one I stand by.
This was so painful a choice, really. The Beatles on Ed SUllivan had to be knocked out immediately 'cuz it wasn't comedy. The MASH clip was too dramatic to be considered. The Newhart clip, classic as it was, had to go, too. The Mary Tyler Moore clip fell off. This left me with the ones that made me laugh most. Seinfeld's contest episode can't really count as a moment--it was a memorable EPISODE, but not a single moment. OUT. The Honeymooners moment still didn't beat, for me, the "poloponies" bit. OUT. All in the Family is the greatest comedy show ever, but the Sammy Davis moment takes a back seat to others on the show. OUT. The Carol Burnett Show's spoof of Gone With The Wind was brilliantly performed and written and still made me laugh out loud--a machine gun of comedy moments. But culturally significant? No. OUT. This left the Battle Royale between Carson's moment with Ed Ames (which I believe left the door open for a new kind of comedy on TV) and Lucy & Ethel's manic wrapping of the chocolates (an incredible bit of inspired set-up and play-off, sent stratospheric by two great performances). In the end, I had to look deep in my heart and admit that....LUCY IS THE WINNER. And that's why she's our Oracle here on the nose. Even people who have never seen an episode of Lucy somehow know about this bit, and it was staged over 50 years ago. Tough choice but there it is.

As for the drama moments, this was easier. I failed to respond to any of the kissy moments, so X-Files, Moonlighting, ER--OUT. As much as I like the movies Duel and Jane Pittman, I feel the movies as a whole are more memorable than any single moment they gave us (though the lead performances in both are outstanding). So they're OUT. The moment from The Sopranos, culminating with the incredible line "His house looked like shit" was a great scene, but not the best of the series by any stretch. OUT. I was impressed by the explosive moments from two series I've seen almost none of: Lost and Grey's Anatomy, but since I haven't seen the series in question, and have never heard anybody talking about these moments as touchstones, they're OUT. JR getting shot is an obvious choice from Dallas, but what a terrible show. OUT. The end of The Fugitive was obviously earth-shaking, but I had to go with my gut and say it was OUT as well, because I don't think the series has survived as a rewatchable piece all these years. This leaves three quite downbeat scenes to battle it out: the devistating ending from The Twilight Zone's "To Serve Man," the heartbreaking deathbed scene between Billy Dee Williams and James Caan in Brian's Song, and the gut-wrenching revelation that Charles Ingalls' daughter Laure was to be blind in Little House on the Prairie. ZONE had to go, because it's pure conjecture that the "To Serve Man" episode is any better than any one of the 25 great episodes of the series. OUT. And though Michael Landon actually looks as if he is about to lose it completely in his scene, I had to go with the scene from BRIAN'S SONG, not only for the deathbed scene which is soul-sapping, but because I know that the scene after it is an equally tearful dedication speech to the memory of Brian Piccalo. No one who has ever seen BRIAN'S SONG could truly have remained unmoved during these scenes. It's just physically impossible. And though I would have possibly voted for Agent Cooper's backwards-running dream in TWIN PEAKS over it, I feel no qualms about giving the award to this fine TV movie.

Okay...now you....ALL of you, please...

Lisa said...

Well, I went with Lucy for comedy, but I did choose Star Trek, of course, probably more purely for the impact that forty years of it has had on me than even that episode. As always, your choices were better thought-out than mine, and excellent, of course!

Jane said...

Like Lisa, I picked Lucy and Star Trek too. Duh. When it comes to television, we were separated at birth.